Homeshareus

A Multigenerational, Modern Farmhouse


A Multigenerational, Modern Farmhouse

Architecture

by Amelia Barnes

Timber furniture and ceiling softens the monochrome interior palette. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

Satisfying linearity. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

The central breezeway. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

A festival of textures as exposed brick meets the timber ceiling and polished concrete in the living room. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

Artwork adds a pop of colour! Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

Light and dark meet. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

Maximum glazing at every opportunity fill the rooms with natural light and views. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

A clean and sophisticated kitchen space. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

Iggy + Lou jug. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

The central living pavilion. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

A shaft of light filters directly into the bathtub. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

The master bedroom looks out over rolling hills. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

‘The use of timber on the exterior adds to the barn-like aesthetic.’ Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

A perfectly framed view. Photo – Lillie Thompson. Styling – Jessica Lillico.

When engaged to design a holiday house for two families spanning multiple generations,  Tom Robertson Architects took an unorthodox approach. Instead of designing the one large or multi-level space, the practice imagined this home as a pair of near identical pavilions, joined by a central breezeway. The reasons for this floorplan were twofold, as director Tom Robertson explains, ‘Rooms were arranged along the central axis, creating a hierarchy of spaces. In addition, the final floorplan allowed a level of flexibility for each of the families.’ 

The pavilion forms of the house were influenced by the local farming vernacular, as previously explored singular forms felt ‘too embossing’ says Tom. ‘A more articulated series of pavilions was preferred, sitting comfortably in the landscape.’ The use of timber cladding on the exterior adds to the barn-like aesthetic. 

At its core, this is a robust, versatile and low maintenance home, offering a calm retreat from city life, and incredible views across the Phillip Island landscape. It’s a home that’s highly functional, but full of joy.

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